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About Us

Our member biographies

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Chris Thompson

I am the Partnership Officer for the county division, a police staff post I have held since retiring as a Police Inspector in 2006. I have worked for Nottinghamshire Police for over 40 years. I joined the then Nottinghamshire Combined Constabulary as a Police Cadet way back in 1973, I had just left school at the age of 16. I had always wanted to be a police officer, becoming a police constable in 1975, I was posted to my first station, Newark, the town I had grown up in.  I also served as a uniformed constable at Bestwood Park in Nottingham. Between 1982 and 1990 I was a city traffic department officer. Part of that role included providing firearms cover, dealing with serious and fatal road collisions as well as supporting front line beat officers. And of course I was involved in policing the miner’s strike, a really tough time for the force.I was promoted to Sergeant in 1990, moving to the brand new Oxclose Lane Police Station. In 1997 I was promoted to Inspector serving at Oxclose Lane, Radford Road and Carlton. I completed my career at Eastwood, where I was the Local Area Commander. As partnership officer I provide support to the Divisional Command Team, Community Safety Partnerships and the wider Local Strategic Partnerships in meeting their statutory responsibilities under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. Part of my role includes administering the Independent Advisory Group, a job I am proud to do and which I take very seriously. As an organisation we have a duty to understand the diverse communities that we serve, getting to know people, learning about their fears and concerns. The IAG membership offers advice to Nottinghamshire Police about many things, it is part of my job to ensure that we listen to that advice and act to work with senior managers to ensure our policies and procedures are fair and equitable to everyone. I am available to meet anyone who believes that they have a contribution to make to the Nottinghamshire Police Independent Advisory Group, I can be contacted at chris.thompson@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk or call 101 and follow the prompts. I am also on twitter, follow me at @ChrisThompsonNP

Bettina Wallace

Bettina Wallace is from the African Caribbean community. Now in her early 60s she has been involved with the IAG for about 3 years. She is a self-employed professional florist , cake baker and decorator, along with events management and room decorator.  Previously to being self-employed she has worked for the majority of her life within Local Government and the Civil Service. She is a qualified trainer and HR professional.  She is very passionate about developing people within the community. She has held a number of positions in the voluntary sector mainly the African Caribbean community. She has also been a Company Secretary of a tripartite community employment agency (JIPAC). Finally she hasbeen a Board member for the National Probation Service for a number of years. Bettina is hoping to work more with the police’s training department advising on Equality and Diversity Issues. Once recruitment  is once again a viable option she would welcome the opportunity to get involved with the recruitment process.  Bettina describes herself as Professional, Passionate and Focused. She would encourage other members of our rich diverse community to become an IAG member.

AP

AP has been a member of IAG since 2007, she  originates from India, her mother was a Hindu and her father was a Sikh. She has worked in an educational environment for the last 15 years, helping and supporting learners with challenging behaviour and learning difficult. She has also worked with local people from diverse backgrounds building their confidence to access education and training whether this is at main stream college or in small community setting. She would describe herself as friendly, reliable as well as professional person. She believes that Nottinghamshire Police should promote the IAG more in to the community so local people within the community know they can be approached with any issues or concerns.Local people might feel more comfortable talking to less official people in their own language could be advantage.MW is a 64 years old retired member of the Notts Fire and Rescue Service and also a retired Finance Officer from Notts County Council. His main interest is the inequality that disabled people have to endure and was on the National Disabled Members Committee with UNISON. Treasure of Notts and Derby Polio Fellowship and Notts County FC Disabled Supporters Association. He was a school governor for over 20 years and chair for over 10 years. He is a Neighbourhood Co-ordinator and a member of Police Disability Advisory Group. 

David Simmons

David Simmons, 59 years of age a company director, he has been a member of the IAG about 10 years. He is of the Jewish faith. Interests relating to the IAG? - Hate Crime, Racism, Equality, Fairness Outside IAG - Football, Cricket, Travel. His aims for the IAG are for the Police to recognise fair criticism when it is given and take on board experience gained by the group members in other walks of life. Three words to describe himself, family and community minded. He believes that IAG members can help the police by providing details of their experiences, both positive and negative, that might help the Police to work in the best interests of the communities they serve.  

Blair Lawrence Broughton

Blair Lawrence Broughton (black British) is 26 years old working as a Community Employability worker. DShe is a new IAG member, but had been a member a few years  ago. She really wants the  IAG to help the police service hear the voice of the man/woman on the street. By being an IAG member she also hopes to have a better understanding of how the police service works. She would describe herself as, energetic, caring, analytical.Mark Kirsch is also from the Jewish community, he is 73 and is retired. He has been involved with the IAg for some 15 years.His IAG interests; Hate Crime, Racism, Equality, FairnessOutside IAG – Family, Travel, Football, keeping fit.He believes that the Police should recognise fair criticism when it is given and take on board experience gained by the IAG group members in other walks of life.Three words to describe himself, he is family and community minded and enjoys voluntary work.

FS

FS originates from Persia and has lived in the UK since 1978. He teaches Physics in a secondary school. He has two children, his daughter is 23 years old and he has a son who is 18 years old. He has also magistrate, appointed in October 2005. Invited and attended the Queen's Garden Party in July 2006. British since February 1993, he says he is  very proud to be British. He appreciates our human rights, our Justice System and our National Health Service.

MI

MI is 40 years old work in Nottingham as a customer service specialist for one of   Nottingham's largest employers. MI has a disability, she works her employer to combat issues and challenges which colleagues find difficult relating to various issues including their disability race, culture etc. MI describes herself as open-minded, determined and proactive which is why she joined the IAG, she has been a member of the IAG for only three months.  She  would like the group to raise issues and tackle issues which truly affect the community, networking and building confidence with members of the public. Aimed at creating a safer better connected community.

Amdani Juma

Amdani Juma is a new IAG member originally  from Rwanda. He has worked in the fields of International Refugee Protection since 1995 and HIV Prevention activities and support since. He is a part time director of the African Institute for Social Development(AISD) an organisation that provides a voice to African men, women and young people in Nottinghamshire and the region. He also works part time  at the Terrence Higgins Trust(THT), his role involves planning, design and management of health promotion and health awareness with the BME communities living in Nottingham city and county. He is a co-founder of the Sanctuary Nottingham, a community group that helps BME LGBT in Nottinghamshire.  He is  a trustee and director of the Nottinghamshire Refugee Forum(NNRF). He has also served in the Community and Media Subgroup of the Home Office  National Refugee Integration Forum (NRIF)) to deliver changes in Integration and Safety. 

 

Police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy (PEEL) Assessment

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Nottinghamshire is home to 1.1m people, a third of who live in Nottingham city. There, the make-up is culturally and ethnically diverse with more than one in three citizens’ non-white British.1 More than 15% of the city’s population has only lived in the UK since 1991.1

The population is further swelled by 45,000 university students. Their integration into residential areas, awareness of crime prevention, ASB, and their impact on the city’s vibrant night-time economy, present their own challenges.

The county’s economy features major global companies but unemployment is above the national average2 and there are areas of intense social deprivation, including former coalfields in the county and wards within the city. Nottingham is ranked 20th out of 326 districts in England in the Indices Of Deprivation (IOD) by the DCLG.3

In 2013/14 the force answered more than 1million phone calls, recording 68,514 crimes. A key theme now is to reduce demand and reoffending through a partnership approach to early intervention and prevention.

The force is also committed to lowering violent crime through the development of an alcohol strategy, reduce ASB by 50% and tackle domestic abuse, which accounts for 41% of all recorded violence.

Significant reductions in funding have meant £43m has been saved since 2010 while a further £30m fall is expected by 2020. 4 The national funding formula also disadvantages Nottinghamshire by some £12m each year.

To meet this challenge Nottinghamshire has redesigned the way it operates, pursuing a number of collaborative opportunities with neighbouring forces in major crime investigation, forensics, criminal justice and specialist operational support.

Increased collaboration with local partners has also grown, such as the integrated service in Nottingham with the city council’s Community Protection.

Alongside this is a commitment to put the public’s needs at the heart of everything it does and promise to ‘be there when you need us.’

Sources of information to verify the statement:

  • Source 1: Census 2010
  • Source 2: Office of National Statistics
  • Source 3: Department for Communities and Local Government.
  • Source 4: Force statistics

 

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